Real-time collaboration comes to Book Creator for Chrome

Dan KempChrome, Collaboration, News

We are so excited to announce our latest update to Book Creator for Chrome – this might just be the update you’ve been waiting for.

Teachers and students can now work on books together at the same time with real-time collaboration!

Just turn on collaboration for a book and anyone in the library can then work on the book. This major update is something we’ve been working on for a while, and we’re really pleased to finally announce it.

Here’s what you need to know.

New Collaborate button in the share menu

This is a paid feature

Real-time collaboration will be available to anyone who has subscribed to a paid plan in Book Creator for Chrome. So if you’ve already signed up to a teacher or school plan, you’ll find the update available the next time you login to the app. Just follow the guidance in our support article.

How to collaborate

There’s a free trial to get started

If you’re on the free plan (1 library, 40 books), but you’d like to try out collaboration, you can activate your free 14-day trial from within the app. No commitment, no payment details required.

It’s not available on iPad…

…yet. We’re working on bringing all of the recent features we’ve included in Book Creator for Chrome to our iPad app. This will be sometime later this year. That said, you can of course use the web app if you’ve installed the Chrome browser on an iPad.

Ready to collaborate?

Collaborating in the classroom

So, how will you use this new feature with your students? In reality, a class book can take any form—it could be a ‘getting to know’ you book for the start of the year; or a research journal where you work on a page each to show your learning. Or maybe even team up with another school from across the world and share knowledge about your different cultures?

A group of teachers tested this feature out during #BookCreator Twitter chat recently, working together on a book to answer questions about using technology to improve literacy. 

We have lots of examples of where collaboration can work well (note, these were mostly made using the method where students work separately and then combine the books into one—this method will still work if you prefer it).

Do you have any ideas for how you’ll use this feature with your students? Share them in the comments below!

Dan Kemp is Red Jumper’s Community Manager. He spends his time spreading the word about Book Creator and supporting people who use it.

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